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1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton

Posted by on Thursday, December 22, 2016 in 1930s, Articles, Deluxe Eight, Packard

As we all know, Packard is more than just a recent cinema roll model for respectable motor cars; Packard is a 1899 founded company which provided us many of the desirables which we crave in our collector vehicles. Curves are sumptuous. Straight lines direct the eye. Power moves the heart. Engineering moves the mind. All of these characteristics bring forth what Packard meant to the American automobile industry.

1915 Packard 5-48

Fenders were still just a function of design rather than a design element even at Packard. This mighty 1915 Model 5-48 sport’s flowing fenders accomplish the ability to stand out from the crowd. Packard parked a pair of spares at the rear.

At its height, Packard was a marque, luxury automobile provided to the elite who searched for, not only the distinguishable, but also the uniqueness that a new motor car should provide to the peak of fortitude. These attempted to compete against the European models such as Rolls-Royce and Mercedes-Benz, all the while manufactured in the central US with locations such as Michigan and Ohio.

Rolls-Royce 1932 Phantom II Croydon Victoria Brewster & Co. New York

The Rolls-Royce P II was lavished with the most luxurious coachwork of any Phantom model. Many of the stately coachbuilt cars had an air of flamboyance typical of the 1930s, but few had the uncharacteristic flair of this 1932 Croydon Victoria created by Brewster & Co. in New York. The body style was more frequently seen on models such as Packard and Duesenberg. This example was built for Mrs. Jessie Woolworth Donahue at a cost in 1932 of $18,600.

Packard began well before the luxury, attitude, revelry, and respectable nature which the brand afforded later models. In fact, reliability of most high priced automobiles usually fell short of what should be expected. At the turn of the century, Packard’s new mechanical machines cost nigh on 1,000 USD. That doesn’t appear distracting, eh? Keep in mind, an average, annual wage ranked around 450 USD — yet you thought $14.5k pa was raking high. Also, an entire house … yes, a house … averaged 5,000 USD.

To purchase a “standard” automobile, you would spend 1/5 of an entire house! As well, this payment was not for an extravagant automobile such as a Packard. Why? Well, Packard moved into a few awkward adjustments in the mid-1900s. The most popular seller during the 1930’s was a straight 8-cylinder, but then included a twin 6 — later to be renamed the Packard Twelve. Yes, this sublime automobile also touted similar power of European autos offering a much higher price tag.

Not to beat a documentary into the ground, but these high quality manufacturers consumed the market through the Great War all the way through World War II producing aircraft engines for machinery such as the P-51 Mustang. Packard recognised the efforts required to maintain the fortitude of the US whilst maintaining the reliability it desired from day one.

1934 Packard Twelve Custom Dietrich Convertible Victoria

Cadillac had thrown down the gauntlet once again with the V16 and 1931 introduction of a V12. Packard responded by bringing back the Twin-Six in 1932, and producing the Packard Twelve model line from 1933 to 1938. Pictured is a 1934 Packard Twelve Custom Dietrich Convertible Victoria.

Many auto manufacturers designed unique carriages. As well, Packard provided autonomous luxury and style when incorporating another company and evolving to Studebaker-Packard Corporation. As you know, many auto manufacturers come and go — too many, it seems — but Packard have left a defining expectation as to what a proper motor car should provide to the public.

If you have a Packard or another classic you’d like to insure with us, let us show you how we are more than just another collector vehicle insurance company. We want to protect your passion! Click below for an online quote, or give us a call at 800.678.5173.

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